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GEO 2017-2019 Work Program

 

Geo Cold Regions Initiative (GEOCRI)

Activity ID: 114

Overview

The “Cold Regions”, including the Arctic, Antarctic, high-latitude oceans, Himalaya-Third Pole and Mountain cold areas, are experiencing the fastest rate of climate, ecological and environmental change. With its abundant Earth water and relevant phase changing, the cold regions severely affect the dynamic earth’s systems, impact more than one hundred countries of billions of people living therein, and influence many aspects of society in all parts of the world. Scientific research is making it increasingly clear that “What happens in the poles doesn’t stay in the poles”.

Building on its accomplishments during the first ten years implementation of GEOSS, the Information Service for Cold Regions (GEOCRI) was proposed to be a Global Initiative (GI) in the transitional work program. Later in September, 2016, GEOCRI was recommended to the next implementation of GEOSS (2017-2019). GEOCRI is also a Year of Polar Prediction (YOPP) endorsed activity since 2015.

The vision of GEOCRI is to provide coordinated Earth observations and information services across a range of stakeholders to facilitate well-informed decisions and support the sustainable development of the cold regions globally. The GEOCRI mission is to develop a user-driven approach for Cold Regions information services to complement the mainly current science-driven efforts, which will strengthen synergies between the environmental, climate, and cryosphere research efforts and foster the collaboration for improved earth observations and information on a global scale.

Activities for the Work Plan period of 2017-2019

The activities conducted in GEOCRI are grouped into six thematically overarching Tasks: 1) Infrastructures, 2) Monitoring Network and Data, 3) In-situ and Remote Sensing Integration, 4) User Engagement and Communication, 5) Capacity Building and Knowledge Transfer, and 6) Management and Monitoring. The tasks –coordinated by Task Teams- and related activities are the fundamental elements for liaison, coordination, implementation and reporting. Contributors can assign themselves to work for different tasks and related activities; these will form Task Teams. Task Teams will decide on the planning and responsibilities of their activities, and the set milestones and deliverables will be reported to the co-leads and presented to contributors who will provide feedback. Activities are prioritized by the co-lead group, and later by the science/advisory group once established in 2017.

User engagement

GEOCRI user engagement will be done by utilizing several modalities ranging from face-to-face events and capacity building to on-line surveys and - ultimately - operational services developed in contact with the users, including scientists, policy-makers, industry, business/commerce, students, and local communities.

In 2017-2019, the initial stage of activities by the User Engagement and Communication Task Team will include the identification of current and potential user communities, and their specific features, and consultation with these user communities about their needs and expectations on the content and modality of the information services that they would like GEOCRI to offer. The ESA, EU H2020 and other national polar and cold region observation projects, the Copernicus Climate Change service, and user requirement conferences, as well as sets of dedicated tools from the newly granted projects are good examples and approaches in assessing the user requirements and advancing the user engagement.

Future plans

By leveraging the global visibility and convening power of GEO, GEOCRI will setup the pilot services and implement the coordinated network of those services. It will make a positive contribution to national, regional and international decision-making processes and science strategies. GEOCRI, via its contributors, feeds reliable, science-based Earth observation data and information for policy makers, enabling better, well-informed and more effective decisions in cold regions and beyond. GEOCRI will work towards supporting the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the COP21 Paris Agreement and Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.

Resources

GEOCRI’s resources are predominantly in-kind efforts, aimed at leveraging the resources of participating initiatives and organizations to align with GEOCRI’s objectives. Contributions include:

  • SAON: Documenting and understanding the Arctic data management ecosystem; Inventory of arctic observational projects as a contribution to EU PolarNet;
  • SIOS: Implementation phase with a full-fledged activity during 2016, establishment of the knowledge centre. Norway will contribute at least 1M€; Italy to €100,000 to CNR Climate Change Integrated Project);
  • IADC: the portal of the Italian research activities in the Arctic. The cyber-infrastructure NDAC in the frame of the Antarctic Research National Programme (PNRA), in a unique Polar Data Infrastructure (PDI) (€ 200,000);
  • CNR through Climate Change Integrated Project (CCT-IP): upgrading of Ny Alesund as observation super-site in the Arctic (€100,000);
  • Through the Belmont Forum Initiatives, Italy contributes to Cooperative Research Activities (CRA) of the Arctic Observing and Research for Sustainability and of the Mountains as Sentinels of Change. (€ 200,000);
  • INTERACT: The Network for Terrestrial Research and Monitoring in the Arctic receives funding of 10 M€ funding from the EU H2020 for period of 2016-2020;
  • INTAROS (Integrated Arctic Observation System) received more than 15 M€ from the EU Horizon 2020 for the period of 2016-2020, to develop an integrated Arctic Observation System (iAOS);
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences granted 45M CNY ($ 6.7M) for the period of 2016~2021 for promoting pan-Third Pole environmental observations and understanding of the snow and glacier change;
  • Establishment of flagship stations within the Third Pole region for observation and monitoring; (US Dollars : $200,000), rain gauge up to 6500 m in a river basin of the Tibetan Plateau. ESA – MOST / NRSCC / Hydrology and Cryosphere Theme under the 4th cycle 2016~2020 of the:  program (Dragon 4). Six projects have been selected and launched in July 2016. Total resources estimated at 2M€;
  • Snow Observations over Tibetan Plateau (SOTP) was funded with $120,000 from NSF. The monitoring of freezing and thawing cycle over China was granted with $140,000 from NSFC for the period 2015~2018;
  • The inventory of snow over China was just proposed with an amount of $ 3.9M for the period 2017~2021;
  • JAMSTEC, NIPR and Hokkaido University: Arctic Data Archive System (ADS), as a part of GEOSS Portal, in the “Arctic Challenge for Sustainability Projects (ArCS)” supported by MEXT (ca. $8.3M);
  • CARD, a regular member of world data system (WDS), a data infrastructure contributes to the production, and publication of multidisciplinary dataset in Cold regions of China and its surrounding areas;
  • A Chinese cubesat named TW-1A: polar sea ice observation in both Polar Regions proposed by Beijing Normal University and developed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences;
  • The observations by the intended Water Cycle Observation Mission (WCOM): Monitoring of water resources as snow, sea ice, precipitation and soil moisture. ($1.5M), which will be launched in 2020, or so.

Point of Contact

Contributors

Members: Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Iceland, India, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, USA, UK.

Participating Organizations: ICIMOD, ISDE, SAON, and WMO.

Others: Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF).

Linkages across the Work Programme

Flagships: GEO BON, GEOGLAM, GFOI.

Initiatives: AmeriGEOSS; AOGEOSS; Earth Observations in Service of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; GEO-DARMA; GEO ECO; GEOGLOWS; GEO-GNOME; GSNL; GWIS.

Leadership & Contributors (this list is being populated)

Role

Name

Member/PO

Implementing Entity

Email

Lead (PoC)

Yubao Qiu

China

RADI-CAS

qiuyb@radi.ac.cn

Lead

Julie Friddell

Canada

University of Waterloo

julie.friddell@uwaterloo.ca

Lead

Xiao Cheng

China

Beijing Normal University

xcheng@bnu.edu.cn

Lead

Xin Li

China

CAS

lixin@lzb.ac.cn

Lead

Xin Li

China

CAS

lixin@lzb.ac.cn

Lead

Xin Li

China

CAS

lixin@lzb.ac.cn

Lead

Hannele Savela

Finland

University of Oulu

hannele.savela@oulu.fi

Lead

Massimo Menenti

Italy

TU Delft

m.menenti@tudelft.nl

Lead

Vito Vitale

Italy

CNR

v.vitale@isac.cnr.it

Lead

Hiroyuki Enomoto

Japan

NiPR

enomoto.hiroyuki@nipr.ac.jp

Lead

Lasse Pettersson

Norway

NERSC

lasse.pettersson@nersc.no

Lead

Jeff Key

United States

NOAA

jeff.key@noaa.gov

Lead

Peter Pulsifer

United States

University of Colorado

peter.pulsifer@colorado.edu

Contributor

Ricardo Jana

Chile

n/a

rjana@inach.cl

Contributor

Luciano Parodi

Chile

n/a

lparodi@minrel.gob.cl

Contributor

Siri-Jodha Khalsa

IEEE

IEEE

sjsk@nsidc.org

GEO Sec Rep

Vanessa Aellen

GEO Secretariat

GEO

vaellen@geosec.org

 

 

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GEO Secretariat
7 bis, avenue de la Paix
Case postale 2300
CH-1211 Geneva 2
Switzerland

e-mail: secretariat@geosec.org
phone: +41 22 730 8505
fax: +41 22 730 8520